Short Course Sponsor

UNC Charlotte Center City

Continuing Education Credits

The Annual Meeting offers an excellent opportunity to earn CEUs toward your general continuing education requirements for your employer or K-12 school. Credits are available for technical sessions, short courses, and field trips. Ten contact hours are required for one CEU. For example, one day (8 hours) of technical sessions offer 0.8 CEUs. After the meeting, contact Beth Engle , for a meeting evaluation form; after GSA receives your evaluation, a CEU certificate will be mailed to you (within two weeks).

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Short Courses

All short courses will take place at UNC Charlotte Center City, 320 E. 9th Street, Charlotte, NC 28202. Room numbers are noted in descriptions below.

Cancellation deadline: 9 October

Short courses are open to all. Early registration is highly recommended to ensure course viability. Contact Jennifer Nocerino, , for additional information.

  • Can I take a short course if I am not registered for the meeting?
    YES! You’re welcome to—just add the meeting nonregistrant fee (US$40 by 1 Oct.) to your course enrollment cost. Should you then decide to attend the meeting, your nonregistrant payment will be applied toward meeting registration.
  • GSA K-12 teacher members: You are welcome to take short courses without registering for the meeting or paying the nonregistrant fee.
  • Where will my short course be held? All Short Courses are being held at the UNC Charlotte Center City, 320 East 9th Street. Maps can be found in the box above under “Useful links”. All room numbers are listed below after the name, date and time of the course you are interested in attending. UNCC is in walking distance of all GSA hotels.
Learn & Explore!

501. New Developments in Fluorescence Spectroscopy to Characterize Dissolved Organic Matter.
Fri., 2 Nov., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 904. US$65; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 25. CEU: 0.8.
Rose Cory, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill; Adam Gilmore, HORIBA Instruments Inc.

• Course Description

This short course will introduce participants to the new “Aqualog” fluorometer by Horiba Scientific that has significantly increased the sensitivity of emission detection and throughput capability, thereby making possible the analysis of the fluorescent fraction of dissolved organic matter (FDOM) with the temporal and spatial resolution needed to understand its biogeochemistry in natural waters. The second component of the short course will cover best practices for FDOM sample collection and data analysis, including an overview of PARAFAC and the steps needed to assemble a PARAFAC-ready FDOM dataset.

502. Sequence Stratigraphy for Graduate Students.
Fri.–Sat., 2–3 Nov., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 901. US$55; registrants will receive a coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore for US$25 upon signing in at the course. Limit: 55. CEU: 1.6.
Cosponsors: BP; Chevron; Anadarko; ExxonMobil; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division.
Art Donovan, BP; Morgan Sullivan, Chevron; Bret Dixon, Anadarko; Bob Stewart; ExxonMobil.

• Course Description

This 2-day short course is designed to teach graduate students the principles, concepts, and methods of sequence stratigraphy. Sequence stratigraphy is a methodology that uses stratal surfaces to subdivide the stratigraphic record. This methodology allows the identification of coeval facies, documents the time-transgressive nature of classic lithostratigraphic units, and provides geoscientists with an additional way to analyze and subdivide the stratigraphic record. Using exercises that utilize outcrop, core, well-log and seismic data, the course provides a hands-on experience to learning sequence stratigraphy. The exercises include classic case studies from which many sequence stratigraphic concepts were originally developed. Fee to include a coupon redeemable at the GSA bookstore onsite for $25 when registrant signs in at the course.

503. Field Safety Leadership.
Fri.–Sat., 2–3 Nov., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 806. US$25; includes continental breakfast and lunch, plus registrants will receive a coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore for US$55 upon signing in at the course. Limit: 24. CEU: 1.6.
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company & ExxonMobil Exploration Company.
Stephen Oliveri, ExxonMobil Corp.; Kevin Bohacs, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company; Amy Ruf, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.

• Course Description

Participants will acquire and practice strategies and tactics to prepare for and conduct safe and effective field activities. The first day of this fully interactive course covers common injuries, why accidents occur (human factors analysis), American Red Cross First Aid - When Help Is Delayed certification, and the field safety process in normal operations and emergency response through scenario analysis, problem solving, and role play. On the second day, participant teams take turns leading a model field day at a site near Charlotte, including briefings, driving, hiking, risk assessment, intervening for safety, safety equipment use, and emergency response drills. Fee to include a coupon redeemable at the GSA bookstore onsite for $25 when registrant signs in at the course.

504. Introduction to Petroleum Structural Geology. — FULL
Fri.–Sat., 2–3 Nov., 8 a.m.–5 p.m.Room 805. US$25; includes continental breakfast and lunch, plus registrants will receive a coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore for US$55 upon signing in at the course. Limit: 30. CEU: 1.6.
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, ExxonMobil Exploration Company, ConocoPhillips, GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Peter Vrolijk, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; Peter Hennings, ConocoPhillips; J. Steve Davis, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.

• Course Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce geoscience graduate students to the fundamental sub-disciplines within petroleum structural geology including approaches to seismic interpretation, characterization of fractures and stress, and trap analysis.  The course uses practical exercises to emphasize the application of structural analysis to problems of petroleum trapping and the interaction of multi-phase fluids with geologic structures and rocks in the subsurface. The intended audience includes MS and PhD candidates. The course lasts two days, and participants need to attend both days to gain the maximum benefit. Fee to include a coupon redeemable at the GSA bookstore onsite for $25 when registrant signs in at the course.

505. Volcanic Crisis Awareness.
Fri., 2 Nov., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. and Sat., 3 Nov., 8 a.m.–12 p.m. Room 905. FREE. Limit: 30. CEU: 1.2.
Cosponsors: FEMA via National Preparedness Training Center.
Bruce Houghton, University of Hawaii; Lydia Morikawa, University of Hawaii.

• Course Description

This 1½-day course will provide an introduction to volcanic crises in the United States and an understanding of:
• Processes, impacts, and causes of volcanic hazards
• Current monitoring and hazard assessment tools and products
• Community response to eruptions and volcanic crises
It is designed primarily (but not exclusively) for graduate students.
In the final module, students will participate in a facilitator-led scenario that challenges them to identify effective actions that will reduce the impact of an unfolding volcanic crisis . Students who successfully complete a pre- and a post- test will be eligible for FEMA certification.

506. Structural and Stratigraphic Concepts Applied to Basin Exploration. — FULL
Fri.–Sat., 2–3 Nov., 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 804. US$55; includes continental breakfast and lunch, plus registrants will receive a coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore for US$25 upon signing in at the course. Limit: 30. CEU: 1.6.
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Exploration Company; ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division.
Lori Summa, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; Bob Stewart, ExxonMobil Exploration Co.

• Course Description

This course will explore concepts, methods, and tools of petroleum geoscience used on a day-to-day basis in the energy industry. We focus on how we make decisions with limited information, evaluate risk vs. uncertainty, and maximize value from integrated teams. Day 1 reviews fundamental stratigraphic and structural concepts. Day 2 is an applied problem in basin exploration. Students will make play maps, bid on prospective acreage, and analyze individual prospects within that acreage. Throughout the course we stress integration across disciplines and scales, focusing on interaction and expression of basin formation, fill, and evolution processes from regional to prospect scale. Fee to include a coupon redeemable at the GSA bookstore onsite for $25 when registrant signs in at the course.

507. Best Practices for Preparing Workforce and Transfer Students in Two-Year Colleges for Geoscience Careers.
Sat., 3 Nov., 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Room 902. US$55; includes lunch. Limit: 50. CEU: 0.7.
Cosponsors: Centers for Ocean Science Education Excellence; National Science Foundation; National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
Eric Baer, Highline Community College; Robert Blodgett, Austin Community College District.

• Course Description

Participants will learn about successful 2YC college transfer and geotechnical workforce programs and practices, effective student research and internship programs, and geoscience career resources for 2YC students and faculty.  Discussion will also include strategies for easily and effectively incorporating career information and professional skills into introductory geoscience courses.  The workshop will be valuable for faculty and administrators from two-year colleges and from four-year colleges and universities who desire effective transfer programs with 2YCs, as well as representatives from professional organizations and employers.

508. Instructional Approaches to Access, Accommodation, and Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in the Geosciences.
Sat., 3 Nov., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 501. US$65; includes lunch. Participants will be reimbursed for the expense of the short course registration after attending. Limit: 50. CEU: 0.8.
Cosponsors: National Science Foundation; National Association of Geoscience Teachers; The International Advisory for Geoscience Diversity.
Christopher Atchison, Georgia State University; Brett Gilley, University of British Columbia; Gina Ceylan, University of Missouri.

• Course Description

Participants of this short course will learn the principles of universal design and apply these principles to their own lessons, labs, and field trips in order to accommodate students with a variety of physical disabilities.  The presentation of this course will include student instructors who will discuss first-hand perspectives of negotiating the rigor of a geoscience curriculum while managing their disabilities.  Key topics will include: accommodation in the geosciences; the physical barriers to access and inclusion; and the personal, psychological and social challenges that students may face away from the classroom. Participants will be reimbursed for the expense of the short course registration after attending.

509. Near-Surface Geophysics for Non-Geophysicists.
Sat., 3 Nov., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 502. US$140; includes lunch and course materials. Limit: 45. CEU: 0.8.
Gregory Baker, University of Tennessee.

• Course Description

This one-day short course--designed for  faculty, and students with little or no background in geophysics--provides a brief overview of state-of-the-art near-surface geophysical techniques and applications. The principle objectives for participants are to develop sufficient comprehension of methods to (1) better understand potential applications (including pitfalls and constraints) to their present/future research, and (2) be able to more readily interact and define objectives with geophysical experts when developing collaborations. We will focus on surface (as opposed to borehole) techniques and include seismic (reflection, refraction, and surface waves), ground penetrating radar, electrical, magnetic, and electromagnetic methods.

510. Estimating Groundwater Recharge.
Sat., 3 Nov., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 504. US$170; includes lunch. Limit: 35. CEU: 0.8.
Richard Healy, U.S. Geological Survey; Bridget Scanlon, The University of Texas at Austin.

• Course Description

Quantification of groundwater recharge is a critical issue for assessing water resources and for determination of aquifer vulnerability to contamination. This course will focus on the basic principles of techniques such as water-budget, tracer, surface-water, groundwater, and modeling methods for estimating recharge. Emphasis is placed on the space/time scales and reliability of estimates.  This course will provide practical information that will allow hydrologists to choose and apply appropriate techniques for quantifying recharge in different settings.

Course Series #511— Two for One deal (see courses for details)

511A. Active Lectures in Classrooms of All Sizes.
Sat., 3 Nov., 8 a.m.–noon, Room 904. US$75 for one course—OR get two for one!—US$45 for combined courses (add 511C or 511D); includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
Mark Leckie, University of Massachusetts–Amherst; Jessica Smay, San José City College; Karen Kortz, Community College of Rhode Island

• Course Description

Research indicates that shifting instruction from lecture-centered to student-centered improves students’ learning. Participants in this half-day workshop will learn classroom techniques to make lectures more interactive. The techniques presented, such as Lecture Tutorials, ConcepTests (with or without clickers), Think-Pair-Shares, Minute Papers, and Pyramid Exams, can be used in classrooms of any size, without special tools. Each teaching technique will be demonstrated using multiple classroom-ready examples, and participants will be guided as they create and practice their own examples. Participants will leave the workshop with a set of techniques they can apply to their own courses to better engage their students and improve their learning.

511B. Teaching about Hazards in the Geoscience Classroom.
Sat., 3 Nov., 8 a.m.–noon. Room 906. US$75 for one course—OR get two for one!—US$45 for combined courses (add 511C or 511D); includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
John McDaris, Science Education Resource Center at Carleton College; Wendi Williams, Northwest Arkansas Community College.

• Course Description

Natural and environmental hazards such as earthquakes, hurricanes, floods or oil spills provide opportunities for students to understand the relevancy of the geosciences in society.  This half-day workshop will showcase several strategies for engaging students in learning about hazards.  Approaches for teaching about hazards can range from use of case studies to investigating locally-relevant hazard risks and scale from single learning activities to full courses. Participants will explore teaching activities that can be used in a variety of course settings and will share ideas with each other for using hazards to create appealing and engaging learning experiences for geoscience students.

511C. Making the Invisible Visible: Assessing Higher Order Thinking in your Students.
Sat., 3 Nov.,1-5 p.m. Room 904. US$75 for one course—OR get two for one!—US$45 for combined courses (add 511A or 511B); includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
Bruce Herbert, Texas A&M University.

• Course Description

This workshop will explore assessment of student learning through a backwards design framework championed by Wiggins and McTighe.  The workshop will provide concrete examples of specific assessment techniques that can provide insight on student skill development towards general higher order thinking skills as well as disciplinary expertise.  These techniques can be used to inform your day-to-day teaching practice, future course design, or help meet accountability programs on your campus.  Participants will have an opportunity to collectively develop assessment strategies for their own classes.

511D. Design an Effective Field Experience.
Sat., 3 Nov., 1-5 p.m. Room 906. US$75 for one course—OR get two for one!—US$45 for combined courses (add 511A or 511B); includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
David Mogk, Montana State University; Steven Whitmeyer, James Madison University.

• Course Description

Learning in the field can be one of the most enriching experiences for our students in the Earth science curriculum.  This workshop will help participants design and implement a field experience to optimize learning by your students.  We define field experiences broadly to include any number of instructional activities such as exploring, collecting, monitoring, and mapping outside the classroom and in Nature.  Topics that will be covered include definition of learning goals for your students and in your field setting, planning logistics, preparation of students to be ready to learn in the field, alignment of field activities with the learning goals, and assessments of learning outcomes.   Workshop products will be a fully developed plan for your next class field experience, and for inclusion in the NAGT Field Guide database.


512. Using the Grand Challenges to Improve Instruction of Scientific Literacy and Quantitative Reasoning.
Sat., 3 Nov. — Canceled.

513. Research Initiatives in Northern Hemisphere Quaternary Non-Marine Ostracoda, Workshop II.
Sat., 3 Nov., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 601. US$50; includes lunch, plus registrants will receive a coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore for US$20 upon signing in at the course. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.8.
Cosponsor: National Science Foundation.
Alison Smith, Kent State University; David J. Horne, Queen Mary University of London.

• Course Description

This one-day short course focuses on developments in Quaternary and modern northern hemisphere nonmarine ostracode research.  Goals include  1) to continue an international dialogue among ostracode workers concerning collaborative research in ostracode genetics, paleoclimate reconstruction, paleolimnology and groundwater ecology; and  2) explore the development of linked datasets, cross-training of graduate students, and establishment of taxonomic harmonization procedures.  We invite participation through a plenary session and four focused discussion groups on the development of joint research initiatives. Fee to include a coupon redeemable at the GSA bookstore onsite for $20 when registrant signs in at the course.

514. Rationale and Methods for Regional 3-D Geological Mapping by Geological Survey Agencies.
Sat., 3 Nov. — Canceled.

515. Education Research I: Conducting Qualitative Geoscience Education Research.
Sat., 3 Nov., 8 a.m.–12 p.m. Room 1102. US$100. Limit: 35. CEU: 0.4.
Julie Sexton, University of Northern Colorado.

• Course Description

Participant interviews, open-ended surveys, classroom observations, and small sample sizes: these are characteristics of qualitative education research. More and more geoscientists are conducting qualitative investigations in education whether it is researching effective teaching methods in their own class, investigating the effectiveness of professional development of K-12 teachers, or investigating affective domain and cognition. Geoscientists also are consumers of education research results conducted by other researchers. This short course is intended to introduce geoscientists, those conducting research and those who are consumers of education research, to qualitative education data collection and analysis methods used in science education research. Case studies, demonstrations, and hands-on activities will be used to teach participants how to develop and critique qualitative education research studies. This short course is designed for students, university and K-12 educators, and researchers who are engaged in or who plan to be engaged in geoscience education research. This course can be taken alone or in conjunction with the short course "Conducting Education Research II: An overview of quantitative education research methods."

516. An Inquiry Approach to Teaching Plate Tectonics.
Sat., 3 Nov., 8 a.m.–12 p.m. Room 1104. US$25, includes lunch, plus registrants will receive a coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore for US$25 upon signing in at the course. Limit: 50. CEU: 0.4.
Co-Sponsor: Geoscience Education Division
Davida Buehler, Geological Society of America.

• Course Description

K-12 teachers will have the opportunity to participate in numerous inquiry based activities which they can easily incorporate into the classroom.  Research shows that inquiry based activities help students to gain a deeper understanding of the material and to retain the information for longer periods of time.    Activities covered include the interior of the Earth, continental drift, sea floor spreading, movement between plates and the resulting features along plate boundaries.  This short course will help you to put the learning into the hands of your students and make learning more meaningful to them. Fee to include a coupon redeemable at the GSA bookstore onsite for $25 when registrant signs in at the course

517. U-Pb Geochronology and Hf Isotope Geochemistry Applied to Detrital Minerals.
Sat., 3 Nov., 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 604. US$71, includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 50. CEU: 0.7.
George Gehrels, University of Arizona.

• Course Description

Participants will be introduced to the fundamentals and applications of U-Th-Pb geochronology and Hf isotope geochemistry, especially as applied to detrital minerals.  The course is ideal for faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduate students who are interested in learning more about these isotope systems and how they can be applied to studies of provenance and source terrane characterization.  Topics will include: basics of the U-Th-Pb and Lu-Hf decay systems; measurement methodologies and challenges; data analysis; coordinated application of the two systems to detrital minerals; and future directions. The course is focused on the use of Laser-Ablation Inductively-Coupled-Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

518. Using a Constructivist Approach to Teach Rocks.
Sat., 3 Nov., 1–5 p.m. Room 1104. US$25, includes lunch, plus registrants will receive a coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore for US$25 upon signing in at the course. Limit: 50. CEU: 0.4.
Co-Sponsor: Geoscience Education Division
Davida Buehler, Geological Society of America.

• Course Description

Using the constructivist approach, teachers will participate in a short course that incorporates the three phases in the learning cycle: the exploration phase, the concept development phase and the application phase.  The constructivist approach is an excellent model to use when teaching rocks as it incorporates the basic scientific skills: making observations and inferences.  Several activities on each of the rock types and the rock cycle will be presented during this workshop.  The constructivist approach will help teachers move away from lectures and controlled labs to active students. Fee to include a coupon redeemable at the GSA bookstore onsite for $25 when registrant signs in at the course.

519. Mars for Earthlings: Teaching Modules Integrating Earth and Planetary Science.
Sat., 3 Nov., 1–5 p.m. Room 606. US$50; registrants will receive a coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore for US$20 upon signing in at the course. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsor: NASA; National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
Marjorie Chan, University of Utah; Julia Kahmann Robinson, University of Utah.

• Course Description

This workshop will provide lesson modules integrating Earth analog concepts and recent Mars imagery to engage students in STEM disciplines. Lesson modules are easily integrated into any introductory classes. Accompanying hands-on activities will utilize Google Mars and JMARS software, as well as covering topical themes: “What is the evidence for water on Mars? (mineralogy, diagenesis, sedimentary geology, and surfaces processes)”, “Is there life on Mars? (extremophiles and habitable environments)”, and “How do craters shape the Martian landscape? (relative dating, stratigraphy, surfaces processes)”.  This workshop is for any faculty and postdoctoral scientists/graduate students teaching undergraduate introductory earth or planetary science. Fee to include a coupon redeemable at the GSA bookstore onsite for $20 when registrant signs in at the course.

520. Getting Started in Undergraduate Research for New and Future Faculty.
Sat., 3 Nov., 1–5 p.m. Room 1106. US$55. Limit: 20. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsor: Council on Undergraduate Research Geosciences Division.
Lydia Fox, University of the Pacific.

• Course Description

This workshop is for faculty and postdoctoral scientists/graduate students.  Topics will focus on integrating research practices into the classroom, scaling projects for students, effective approaches to mentoring undergraduate researchers, identifying funding sources.  Based on the demographics of our participants, we may also include information on how to get a job at an academic institution where undergraduate research is required/emphasized.

521. Recalling Optical Mineralogy: Teaching it with Newer Methods and its Role in Current Mineralogy Research.
Sat., 3 Nov., 8 a.m.–noon. Room 606. US$55. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsor: Mineralogical Society of America.
Mickey Gunter, University of Idaho.

• Course Description

The class will focus on the use of the polarizing light microscope (PLM) in the modern geoscience curriculum by exploring:  1) teaching its use with newer methods (i.e., interactive video and animations) and 2) how some well-established methods in optical mineralogy can be integrated into state-of-the-art mineralogical research.  The course will rely heavily on materials published by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) found at their website (www.minsocam.org), and some rational for the course are also in a paper published in the Journal of Geoscience Education (nagt.org/files/nagt/jge/abstracts/Gunter_v52n1p34.pdf).

522. Communicating Science: Tools for Scientists.
Sat., 3 Nov., 1–5 p.m. Room 602. US$55; registrants will receive a coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore for US$25 upon signing in at the course. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsors: GSA Geology and Society Division; GSA Geology and Public Policy Committee; GSA Geoscience Education Division.
Tiffany Lohwater, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Christa Stratton, Geological Society of America; Kasey White, Geological Society of America.

• Course Description

Scientist-communicators who can present messages clearly and foster respect between science and the lay public are essential for true public engagement with critical scientific issues. Scientists are increasingly requested by their institutions and funding agencies to extend beyond the scientific community and communicate their research directly to public audiences, but traditional scientific training typically does not prepare scientists to be effective public communicators. This workshop from the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) will give you guidance on how to hone your public communication and outreach skills and the opportunity to practice in a safe and comfortable setting. Fee to include a coupon redeemable at the GSA bookstore onsite for $25 when registrant signs in at the course

523. Education Research II: Conducting Quantitative Geoscience Education Research.
Sat., 3 Nov., 1–5 p.m. Room 1102. US$100. Limit: 35. CEU: 0.4.
Julie Sexton, University of Northern Colorado.

• Course Description

Quantitative surveys, multiple-choice tests, and large sample sizes: these are characteristics of quantitative education research. More and more geoscientists are conducting quantitative investigations in education whether it is researching effective teaching methods in their own class, investigating the effectiveness of professional development of K-12 teachers, or investigating affective domain and cognition. Geoscientists also are consumers of education research results conducted by other researchers. This short course is intended to introduce geoscientists, those conducting research and those who are consumers of education research, to quantitative education data collection and analysis methods used in science education research. Case studies, demonstrations, and hands-on activities will be used to teach participants how to develop and critique quantitative education research studies. This short course is designed for geoscientists, students, university and K-12 educators, and researchers who are engaged in or who plan to be engaged in geoscience education research. This course can be taken alone or in conjunction with the short course "Education Research I: Conducting Qualitative Geoscience Education Research."

524. Quantitative Literacy and Geology in the National Parks.
Sat., 3 Nov., 1–5 p.m. Room 1105. US$20; this fee will be refunded upon completion of the course. Limit: 20. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsor: National Science Foundation; Geoscience Education Division.
H.L. Vacher, University of South Florida; Mark Rains, University of South Florida; Tom Juster, University of South Florida; Mark Horwitz, University of South Florida; Mark Hainsworth, Emory and Henry College; Susan Sachs, Great Smokey Mountains National Park.

• Course Description

Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum (SSAC) is an online library of modules in which students practice quantitative literacy (QL) by applying foundational mathematics to solve problems in context.  The purpose of this hands-on workshop, which will feature the library’s new Geology of National Parks collection, is to put the library into the hands of K-12 teachers and give them familiarity with what's on the CD, experience in finding what they want in it, some ideas about how to use and adapt modules, and how they mesh with state and national standards.  Participants will need to bring their own laptops.  $20 registration fee will be refunded upon course completion.

525. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (Ground-Based LiDAR) Methods and Applications in Geologic Research & Education. — FULL
Sun., 4 Nov., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 804. US$66, includes lunch. Limited financial support is available for students; see the meeting website for more information. Limit: 20. CEU: 0.8.
Cosponsor: UNAVCO.
David Phillips, UNAVCO; John Oldow, The University of Texas at Dallas; Carlos Aiken, The University of Texas at Dallas.

• Course Description

Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), a.k.a. ground-based LiDAR, workflows and best practices for the acquisition and processing of TLS data, an overview of various TLS platforms, and examples of science and education applications. This 1-day workshop will consist of lectures and hands-on application of TLS equipment and data processing. TLS provides very high-resolution images over relatively small areas, is relatively inexpensive to acquire, and has been used successfully to support a wide range of geoscience investigations from outcrop mapping to deformation monitoring. Limited financial support is available for students (see the Short Course Series page)

526. Introductory Remote Sensing for Geoscientists.
Sun., 4 Nov., 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 801. US$113, includes lunch. Limit: 20. CEU: 0.7.
John Chadwick, College of Charleston.

• Course Description

This 1-day course will provide a comprehensive review of the concepts and applications of remote sensing, a powerful set of tools and techniques for mapping and monitoring the Earth from satellite and airborne platforms.  The course will also review geological and environmental applications of visible, near-infrared, thermal, and microwave remote sensors.   The basic concepts and jargon of the electromagnetic spectrum, sensor components, and digital image data will be reviewed, as well as processing of remote sensing data using commercial software.  The course will be about 50% lecture and 50% hands-on projects for participants to work with image processing software.

527. X-Ray Diffraction in Geosciences.
Sun., 4 Nov., 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 805. US$65, includes lunch, plus registrants will receive a coupon redeemable at the onsite GSA bookstore for US$25 upon signing in at the course. Limit: 100. CEU: 0.7.
Cosponsor: PANalytical.
Sandeep Rekhi, PANalytical; James Kaduk, Poly Crystallography Inc.; Andrew Payzant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Daniel Deocampo, Georgia State University; Surendra Saxena, Florida International University; Saugata Datta, Kansas State University.

• Course Description

X-ray diffractometry is widely utilized to characterize geomaterials. Besides phase identification and quantification of minerals, XRD is useful to study materials in-situ under conditions found in planetary interiors – temperature, pressure, etc.  Similarly, good data is required at low angles to investigate weathered minerals. This course is for beginners and experts alike to explore XRD for analysis of minerals, discuss sample preparation and data collection techniques, and investigate modern XRD techniques to solve complex mineralogy problems. Topics include basic crystallography and x-ray diffraction, structural solution, quantification, various tools for non ambient studies, and spot and imaging analysis in a mineral matrix. Fee to include a coupon redeemable at the GSA bookstore onsite for $25 when registrant signs in at the course.

528. Engaging ALL Students: Effective Strategies for Teaching Diverse College Students.
Sun., 4 Nov., 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Room 1104. US$65, includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.7.
Cosponsors: National Science Foundation Transforming Undergraduate Education Systems Program; NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences Program.
Tim Slater, University of Wyoming; Karen Kortz, Community College of Rhode Island; Stephanie Slater, CAPER Center for Astrophysics & Physics Education Research; Jessica Smay, San José City College.

• Course Description

This participatory workshop provides faculty with effective strategies, classroom-ready tools, and instructional materials designed to effectively teach diverse student populations. These approaches intellectually engage students through collaborative learning through targeted tutorial activity and scaffolded inquiry investigations using online Earth and planetary science data. Focused on instructors teaching a wide diversity of non-science majoring students, the workshop is appropriate for faculty, post-docs, grad students, and advanced high school teachers. Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptops or tablets, equipped with MS Office or Open Office and wireless.

GSA ASSOCIATED SOCIETY COURSE

Reconstructing Earth’s Deep-Time Climate—The State of the Art in 2012.
Sat., 3 Nov., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Charlotte Convention Center Ballroom B.
FREE. Limit: 200. Registration is not necessary; just show up to attend.
Cosponsor: The Paleontological Society.
Linda Ivany, Syracuse University; Brian Huber, Smithsonian Institution.

Course Description (pdf)
Talk Schedule (pdf)

 

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