GSA Joint Section Meeting

Rocky Mountain (70th Annual Meeting)
Cordilleran (114th Annual Meeting)

15–17 May | Flagstaff, Arizona
Double Tree by Hilton Hotel and Conference Center

CALL FOR PAPERS

Submit Online

Abstracts deadline: 20 February

Abstract submission fee: US$18 for students and US$30 for all others. If you cannot submit an abstract online, please contact Heather Clark, +1-303-357-1018.

TECHNICAL SESSIONS

Symposia

S1. Tectonics of the Death Valley Region: A Tribute to Bennie Troxel and Lauren Wright.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics and Geodynamics Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Terry Pavlis, Univ. of Texas–El Paso; Laura Serpa, Univ. of Texas–El Paso; James Calzia, USGS; Darrel Cowan, Univ. of Washington; Marli Miller, Univ. of Oregon.
Wright and Troxel are virtually synonymous with Death Valley. With the recent passing of Bennie Troxel and the earlier loss of Lauren Wright, this session will provide both a retrospective on the importance of the Death Valley region on global tectonic studies as well as recent work in the area.
S2. Cordilleran Tectonics, Metamorphic Core Complexes, Geologic Mapping, and Arizona Geology: A Celebration of Jon Spencer’s Career.
Cosponsored by GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
John Singleton, Colorado State University; Stephen Reynolds, Arizona State Univ.; Kurt Constenius, Univ. of Arizona.
In his 38 years as a geologist for the Arizona Geological Survey (1982–2015) and USGS (1977–1982), Jon Spencer made significant contributions to our understanding of the tectonics of the southwestern U.S. Cordillera, the development of metamorphic core complexes and detachment fault systems, the geologic evolution of the Colorado River and Colorado Plateau, and many aspects of Arizona geology. This session honors Jon’s diverse geological career with contributions from these fields.
S3. Recent Advances in Basin-and-Range and Proterozoic Geology of the Western U.S.: A Session Honoring Ernie Duebendorfer.
Cosponsored by GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Chloe Bonamici, New Mexico Tech; Kevin Chamberlin, Univ. of Wyoming; Mike Williams, Univ. of Mass..
Ernie Duebendorfer has made fundamental contributions in structural geology, petrology, and tectonics. We seek contributions that highlight work in two of his favorite areas of research—Basin-and-Range extension and Proterozoic tectonics. We encourage contributions that integrate field-based structural geology with petrology, geochronology, and geochemistry to address deformation regimes and tectonics.
S4. Jurassic to Cenozoic Geology of Southern California, Southwest Arizona, and Sonora: A Session Honoring Gordon Haxel and Carl Jacobson.
Cosponsored by GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Jon Spencer, Univ. of Arizona; Sue Beard, USGS.
This session is to honor the distinguished careers of Gordon Haxel and Carl Jacobson. We invite talks on all aspects of Cretaceous to Cenozoic geology of southern California, southwest Arizona, and Sonora with emphasis on Jurassic magmatism, Late Cretaceous-Paleogene convergent tectonics, and middle Cenozoic extension.
RISE logo

DEADLINES

20 February
Abstracts Submission

9 April
Early Registration

26 April
Accommodations

Theme Sessions

T1. Miocene to Recent Evolution of the Lower Colorado River Corridor and the Northern Gulf of California.
Cosponsored by GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Ryan Crow, USGS; Kris McDougall, USGS; Scott Bennett, USGS; Mike Darin, Northern Arizona Univ.
To arrive at a holistic view of Miocene to recent evolution of the lower Colorado River corridor and northern Gulf of California, we seek insights from a broad range of studies focused on the sedimentology, stratigraphy, geomorphology, paleontology, and tectonics of the area and the evolution of the Colorado River.
T2. Earth Surface Processes in the Critical Zone.
Cosponsored by GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Hydrogeology Division.
Tim White, Penn State Univ.; Jon Pelletier, Univ. of Arizona.
Critical Zone (CZ) science aims to understand how rock, soil, water, air, and biota influence Earth as a habitable system. Here we develop the concept that to achieve environmental sustainability, society must first understand the CZ, its natural processes and services, and how those processes operate with and without humanity.
T3. Advances in River Science in the Intermountain West.
Cosponsored by GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Hydrogeology Division.
Erich Mueller, University of Wyoming.; Paul Grams, USGS; Daniel Buscombe, Northern Arizona Univ.; Dave Dean, USGS.
In the Colorado River basin, decades of geoscience research guide the management of flow, sediment, and riverine ecology. Applied science has also spurred advances in fundamental river science. We invite contributions on all aspects of river science with emphasis on the interplay among applied science, basic research, and river management.
T4. New Insights into the Development and Evolution of the Colorado River System from Geologic Mapping (Posters).
Cosponsored by GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Kyle House, USGS; Phil Pearthree, Arizona Geological Survey.
This session focuses on the role of geologic mapping in research about the development of the geologic framework within which the Colorado River system formed and its subsequent evolution. Requesting submissions that show the value and importance of geologic mapping in developing new insights into a persistent problem.
T5. Post-Wildfire Hazards: From New Research to Assessments, Prediction, and Mitigation.
Cosponsored by GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Hydrogeology Division.
Ann Youberg, Arizona Geological Survey; Luke McGuire, Univ. of Arizona.
This session aims to highlight new and ongoing research into post-wildfire hazards, such as erosion, sedimentation, flooding, and debris flows. We welcome studies that focus on the processes that generate hazards, new or existing tools for hazard assessments, or new methods to identify and mitigate hazards before a fire occurs.
T6. Colorado Plateau Landscape Evolution—Grand Canyon- and Upper Basin–Focused Colorado River Evolution.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Sue Beard, USGS; Andres Aslan, Colorado Mesa University; Richard Young, SUNY Geneseo; Karl Karlstrom, Univ. of New Mexico.
This session focuses on the current understanding of the evolution of the Cenozoic landscape of the Colorado Plateau and southern Rocky Mountains from the diverse perspectives of field mapping, geophysical analyses, chronology, structural history, thermochronometric data, and modeling studies that constrain the evolution of modern topography and the Colorado River.
T7. Seismic and Geophysical Perspectives: New Insights into the Structure of the Shallow Crust of the Rocky Mountains and Cordillera.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Joshua Coyan, USGS; Geoff Phelps, USGS.
The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in exploration and research in the Cordilleran and Rocky Mountain regions of the U.S. This session focuses on the use of seismic and geophysical data to offer new and exciting insights into the subsurface in these areas.
T8. Laramide Tectonics in the Southwest North American Cordilleran Interior.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Jay Chapman, Univ. of Arizona; Ryan Porter, Northern Arizona Univ., Chris Clinkscales, Univ. of Arizona,
This session will examine the Laramide orogeny in the southern U.S. Cordillera (southern California, Arizona, New Mexico, West Texas) and northwest Mexico. Description: We encourage contributions that compare the Cordilleran Laramide record to the Rocky Mountain region and studies that synthesize results from multiple disciplines, including stratigraphy, structure, geodynamics, petrology, geochronology, and seismic investigations.
T9. Cenozoic Extension in Western North America.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Lisa Lamb, St. Thomas Univ.; John Singleton, Colorado State Univ.; Gary Axen, New Mexico Tech; Jolante Van Wijk, New Mexico Tech; Jason Ricketts, Univ. of Texas–El Paso.
Cenozoic extension in western North America has occurred over varying spatial and temporal scales. We seek studies examining extensional processes using a range of tools, including structural analysis, geochronology, basin analysis, stratigraphy, geochemistry, and geophysics.
T10. Geologic and Structural Evolution of the Transition Zone.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Alan Chapman, Macalester College; Nancy Riggs, Northern Arizona Univ.; Tim Schroeder, Bennington College; Jessie Shields, California State Univ.–Fresno.
The Transition Zone is the geomorphological expression of a major reduction in lithospheric strength from the Colorado Plateau to the Basin and Range. This session seeks contributions in geology, geophysics, geochemistry, volcanology, or geomorphology aimed at understanding the Proterozoic to recent tectonic development of the Transition Zone.
T11. Pennsylvanian to Early Triassic Tectonics of Southwest Laurentia.
Cosponsored by GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Nancy Riggs, Northern Arizona Univ.; Andy Barth, Indiana Univ.; Robinson Cecil, California State Univ.–Northridge.
The southwestern margin of Laurentia underwent profound changes beginning in Pennsylvanian time as passive-margin sedimentation ultimately gave way to a convergent margin that lasted for more than 200 m.y. We seek contributions that address the manifestations of these changes, from structural, igneous, sedimentary, geochronological, or paleontological perspectives.
T12. Plate Margin Processes and Tectonics during the Cretaceous, Western North America.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Bernie Housen, Western Washington Univ.; Basil Tikoff, Univ. of Wisconsin.
In addition to long-standing problems associated with paleomagnetically based reconstructions, new data are provoking reevaluations of models for the Cretaceous-Paleogene margin of the western North America. This session focusses on plate margin and plate interior evolution, including the possibility of major middle Cretaceous plate motion change, for this critical time.
T13. Emerging Ideas on the Ancestral Rocky Mountain System.
Cosponsored by GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Ryan Leary, Northern Arizona Univ.; Paul Umhoefer, Northern Arizona Univ.; Mike Smith, Northern Arizona Univ.
The early Pennsylvanian–middle Permian Ancestral Rocky Mountain system is often cited as an example of intracontinental orogenesis. However, the tectonic origins of this system remain uncertain. We encourage contributions that address all aspects of this system, including basin analysis, tectonic evolution, and geochronology.
T14. Paleomagnetic, Structural, and Geophysical Data Applied to Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Systems, Tectonic Applications, and Paleoclimate Studies.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Michael S. Petronis, New Mexico Highlands Univ.; Filip Tomek, Czech Academy of Sciences; Jennifer Lindline, New Mexico Highlands Univ.
This session will focus on recent advances in the application of geophysical and structural techniques to igneous systems, tectonic processes, and paleoclimate studies. We will focus on the physical emplacement and deformational models of igneous rocks, regional strain accommodation in the upper crust, and secular variation studies to constrain paleoclimate history.
T15. Genetic Links between the Magmatism, Tectonism, and Metallogeny of the Southwestern USA and Northern Mexico.
Simon Jowitt, Univ. of Nevada–Las Vegas; Graham Andrews, West Virginia Univ.
The southwestern USA and northern Mexico host world-class mineral deposits and significant mining districts that formed as a result of interlinked tectonic, magmatic, and metallogenic processes. Here, we invite submissions from researchers working in any of these fields who can provide insights into the genetic history of this well-endowed region of North America.
T16. Understanding Water Resources Related to Mineralized Uranium Deposits in the Southwestern United States.
Cosponsored by GSA Energy Geology Division; GSA Hydrogeology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division.
Johanna Blake, USGS; Kim Beisner, USGS; Jose Cerrato, Univ. of New Mexico; Andrew Robertson, USGS.
The southwestern U.S. contains some of the largest uranium deposits in the world. Mined or natural deposits have the potential to affect water resources in this arid climate. This session aims to share information about uranium reactivity, mobility, and transport related to water and mineralized uranium deposits in the southwest.
T17. Chemical and Isotopic Tracers of Water Sources in Semiarid Regions: From the Mantle to the Atmosphere.
Cosponsored by GSA Energy Geology Division; GSA Hydrogeology Division.
Kimberly Samuels-Crow, Northern Arizona Univ.; Laura Crossey, Univ. of New Mexico, Abe Springer, Northern Arizona Univ.
This interdisciplinary session will focus on chemical and isotopic methods to partition water sources in groundwater, surface water, the terrestrial biosphere, and the atmosphere. Understanding water sources has broad geologic, biologic, and societal implications, particularly for water resources in semiarid regions.
T18. Paleoclimate Records and Future Climate Trends in the American Southwest.
Cosponsored by GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Limnogeology Division.
Tammy Rittenour, Utah State Univ.; Andrea Brunelle, Univ. of Utah.
This session will provide a venue to present research on paleoclimate reconstructions, instrumental record trends, and climate model outputs for the American southwest.
T19. Paleontology of the Colorado Plateau and Environs.
Cosponsored by GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Limnogeology Division.
Dave Elliott, Northern Arizona Univ.; Bill Parker, Petrified Forest National Park.
The Colorado Plateau (CP) and western United States preserve extensive outcrop of sedimentary rocks encompassing much of the Phanerozoic. The extensive and varied fossil record from these exposures forms the backbone of much of what is understood about the fossil record of North America. We encourage submissions that highlight current paleontological research in Arizona and the CP.
T20. Biostratigraphy and Paleoenvironments of Western North America: Correlations across the International Border.
Cosponsored by GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Limnogeology Division.
Pilar Navas-Parejo, UNAM–Hermosillo; Uxue Villanueva, UNAM.
This session focuses on correlations and comparison of the geographical and biostratigraphic distribution of any fossil group of the Phanerozoic in western North America, both in the western U.S. and northwestern Mexico. Abstracts that include biofacies analysis and paleoenvironmental reconstructions are also welcome.
T21. Recent Advances in Planetary Geoscience.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Planetary Geology Division.
Nadine Barlow, Northern Arizona Univ.; Jim Skinner, USGS; Mark Salvatore, Northern Arizona Univ.
We solicit contributions that discuss how the volume and diversity of recent data sets have significantly advanced our understanding of the geologic character and evolution of bodies in the Solar System. Topics can be narrowly or broadly scoped and can include results from surface- and satellite-based investigations and advanced analytical technologies.
T22. Earth as a Stepping Stone for Planetary Exploration.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Planetary Geology Division.
Lauren Edgar, USGS; Christopher Edwards, Northern Arizona Univ.; Jim Skinner, USGS; Kelsey Young, NASA.
Terrestrial research in the field and in the laboratory is necessary for advancing planetary exploration. We invite contributions including, but not limited to, planetary analog research, laboratory work to better understand planetary environments, recent developments in robotic and human exploration, traverse planning, and new field, laboratory, and remote sensing technologies.
T23. Integrating Composition and Morphology: Keys to Constraining Planetary Surface Processes from Spacecraft Data.
Cosponsored by GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division; GSA Planetary Geology Division.
Kristen Bennett, Northern Arizona Univ.; Christopher Edwards, Northern Arizona Univ.; Nadine Barlow, Northern Arizona Univ.; Will Grundy, Lowell Observatory.
Compositional interpretations critically augment geomorphological and/or sedimentological studies to yield a refined understanding of geologic context and surface processes. We solicit contributions from a broad range of surface- and satellite-based studies that discuss the results of these types of geochemical syntheses, including methods to reconcile discrepancies between data sets.
T24. Understanding Basin Environments and Evolution Beyond Earth.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Planetary Geology Division.
Jim Skinner, USGS; Lauren Edgar, USGS, Kristen Bennett, Northern Arizona Univ.; Chris Okubo, USGS.
Though topographic and structural basins exist beyond Earth, lack of direct access makes deciphering exposed units a challenge. We invite contributions that focus on the character, diversity, depositional style, and observational strategies that help resolve basin environments and evolution on Mars and other bodies beyond Earth using surface- and satellite-based data sets.
T25. Geologic Applications of Unmanned Aerial Systems.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Quaternary Geology and Geomorphology Division.
Art Sylvester, Univ. of California Santa Barbara; Ramon Arrowsmith, Arizona State Univ.; Nicholas Barth, Univ. of California Riverside; Chris Crosby, UNAVCO.
Technological advances in hardware and software have led to a substantial increase in worldwide use of small Unmanned Aircraft Vehicles (drones) for research, educational, scientific, and business purposes. This theme session features geologic research applications using drones for photography, photogrammetry, field reconnaissance, LiDAR and thermal imagery, sampling, digital mapping, etc.
T26. Recent Advances in Understanding the Geology of Northwestern Mexico.
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Carlos Gonzalez-Leon, UNAM–Hermosillo; Luca Ferarri, UNAM–Mexico City.
Northwestern Mexico is key for the understanding of the geologic evolution of North America. We invite contributions addressing advances in understanding tectonic, magmatic, and sedimentary events, including the pre-Mesozoic history, accretion of Alisitos/Guerrero terrane, Laramide orogeny and magmatism, the Sierra Madre Occidental SLIP, and the Gulf of California rift.
T27. Geoscience and Environmental Science Education in the Cordillera and Rockies: Research and Practice (Posters).
Cosponsored by GSA Geophysics Division; GSA Geoscience Education Division; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division.
Steven Semken, Arizona State Univ.; Callan Bentley, Northern Virginia Community College.
Presentations on formal or informal teaching of geoscience or environmental science, and research on student or public learning, in or about the Cordillera and Rocky Mountains; curriculum or interpretation design; teaching in classroom, laboratory, field, virtual or online environments, parks, museums, etc.; assessment; and educational research in these contexts.
T28. The Happy Marriage of Geology and Art (Posters).
Cosponsored by GSA Geology and Society Division; GSA Geophysics Division; GSA History and Philosophy of Geology Division; GSA Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, and Volcanology Division;GSA Sedimentary Geology Division.
Steven Emmerman, Utah Valley Univ; Lori Santos, Wichita State.
This session will explore all aspects of the intersection of geology and art, including the role of art in geoscience education, the role of art in the history of geology, the geology of artistic materials, and the artistic depiction of geological phenomena.
T29. Undergraduate Research Session (Posters).
Cosponsored by GSA Energy Geology Division; GSA Limnogeology Division; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division; Council on Undergraduate Research; National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
Jeff Marshall, Cal Poly Pomona.
This poster session will highlight faculty-mentored research conducted by undergraduate students. All abstracts must be written by the student or students and may have non-student co-authors (although a student must present the poster). Topics may include undergraduate research in any discipline of geology or related fields (such as water resources, hydrology, environmental science, or physical geography).