Key
F = Faculty
G = Grad Student
T = K-12 Teacher
P = Professional
Continuing Education Units (CEUs)
Most professional development courses and workshops offer CEUs. One CEU comprises 10 hours of participation in an organized continuing education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction, and qualified instruction.
Contact
Jennifer Nocerino, , for additional information.
Early registration deadline was 6 Sept. After that, fees increased by $30.Cancellations were due on 12 Sept.

Short Courses

The following short courses are open to everyone. Early registration is highly recommended to ensure course viability. All fees are in U.S. dollars.

Can I take a short course if I'm not registered for the meeting?
YES!   Just add the meeting nonregistrant fee ($40) to your course enrollment cost. Should you then decide to attend the meeting, your nonregistrant payment will be applied toward meeting registration. GSA K–12 teacher members: You are welcome to take short courses without registering for the meeting or paying the nonregistrant fee.

Course Locations

Short Courses will be held at two locations: (1) the Hilton where you may proceed directly to your assigned room; and (2) the University of St Thomas where you must check in at our University of St Thomas on site registration desk located at 1000 LaSalle Ave, (TMH) Terrence Murphy Hall, at the corner of LaSalle Ave and 10th Street in Minneapolis.

Courses

P F G 501. The Emerging CCS Industry: An Overview.
Sun., 9 Oct., 8 a.m.–5:30 p.m., Hilton Minneapolis, Red Wing Room
$130; includes lunch. Limit: 50. CEU: 0.95.
Teresa Nealon, Univ. of Wyoming; James Myers, Univ. of Wyoming.

> Abstract
Climate change is a problem affecting the world and its people. Substantially reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, such as CO2 via carbon capture and storage (CCS), would help mitigate this global challenge. Moving CCS from the demonstration to commercial scale will require a large, professional workforce of geoscientists, engineers, environmental specialists, managers, regulators, and legal experts. This course provides professional geologists with an overview of the CCS industry, its regulatory and legal frameworks, best practices for site characterization, underground injection control and public outreach and education. Come see where your future career opportunities lie in this evolving industry!

F G 502. Sequence Stratigraphy for Graduate Students.
Fri.–Sat., 7–8 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, TMH 460
$55; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 55. CEU: 1.8.
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Exploration Company; Chevron Energy Technology Company; British Petroleum; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division.
Art Donovan, British Petroleum; Kathryn Lamb-Wozniak, ExxonMobil Exploration Co.; Morgan Sullivan, Chevron Energy Technology Co.

> Abstract
This short course is designed to teach graduate students the principles, concepts, and methods of sequence stratigraphy. Sequence stratigraphy is a methodology that uses stratal surfaces to subdivide the stratigraphic record. This methodology allows the identification of coeval facies, documents the time-transgressive nature of classic lithostratigraphic units, and provides geoscientists with an additional way to analyze and subdivide the stratigraphic record. Using exercises that utilize outcrop, core, well-log and seismic data, the course provides a hands-on experience to learning sequence stratigraphy. The exercises include classic case studies from which many sequence stratigraphic concepts were originally developed.

F G 503. Field Safety Leadership.
Fri.–Sat., 7–8 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, TMH 255
$55; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 24. CEU: 1.8.
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company; ExxonMobil Exploration Company.
Stephen Oliveri, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; Kevin Bohacs, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; Amy Ruf, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.

> Abstract
Participants will acquire and practice strategies and tactics to prepare for and conduct safe and effective field activities. The first day of this fully interactive course covers common injuries, why accidents occur (human factors analysis), American Red Cross First Aid—When Help Is Delayed certification, and the field safety process in normal operations and emergency response through scenario analysis, problem solving, and role play. On the second day, participant teams take turns leading a model field day at a site north of Minneapolis, including briefings, driving, hiking, risk assessment, intervening for safety, safety equipment use, and emergency response drills.

F G 504. Fundamentals of Seismic Structural Analysis and Hydrocarbon Entrapment Analysis.
Fri.–Sat., 7–8 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, TMH 350
$55; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 30. CEU: 1.8.
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company; ExxonMobil Exploration Company; ConocoPhillips; GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division.
Peter Vrolijk, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; Peter Hennings, ConocoPhillips; J. Steve Davis, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.

> Abstract
The purpose of this course is to introduce geoscience graduate students to the fundamentals of seismic interpretation of structural systems in exploration and production settings and the application of structural interpretations to the problems of petroleum trapping and the interaction of multi-phase fluids with geologic structures and rocks in the subsurface. The intended audience includes both M.S. and PhD candidates. The course lasts two days; participants need to participate both days to realize the benefits of the course.

F G 505. Geological Factors (and Certification) to Determine Radon in Homes and Well Water.
Fri.–Sat., 7–8 Oct. — Canceled.
 

F G 506. Structural and Stratigraphic Concepts Applied to Basin Exploration.
Fri.–Sat., 7–8 Oct., 9 a.m.–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, TMH 301
$55; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 30. CEU: 1.6.
Cosponsors: ExxonMobil Exploration Company; ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division.
Lori Summa, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.; Bob Stewart, ExxonMobil Exploration Co.

> Abstract
This course will explore concepts, methods, and tools of petroleum geoscience used on a day-to-day basis in the energy industry. We focus on how we make decisions with limited information, evaluate risk versus uncertainty, and maximize value from integrated teams. Day 1 reviews fundamental stratigraphic and structural concepts. Day 2 is an applied problem in basin exploration. Students will make play maps, bid on prospective acreage, and analyze individual prospects within that acreage. Throughout the course, we will stress integration across disciplines and scales, focusing on interaction and expression of basin formation, fill, and evolution processes from regional to prospect scale.

F G 507. Preparing for the Tenure Process.
Fri., 7 Oct., 5 p.m.–8 p.m., University of St Thomas, TMH 252
$50; includes a light dinner. Limit: 35. CEU: 0.3.
Cosponsors: On the Cutting Edge; GSA Geoscience Education Division.
Kristen St. John, James Madison Univ.; R. Mark Leckie, Univ. of Massachusetts–Amherst.

> Abstract
This evening workshop is designed to help tenure-track geoscience faculty prepare for the tenure process and make their strongest case for tenure. Workshop discussions and activities will focus on analyses of CVs, personal statements (narratives), and teaching materials that may be used as supporting documentation in tenure applications. Participants will have the opportunity to gain feedback and advice on their own preparation towards tenure. In addition, participants will have the opportunity to review several examples of successful geoscience tenure packages from range of institutions.

F G 508. Near-Surface Geophysics for Non-Geophysicists.
Sat., 8 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, TMH 401
$108; includes course materials. Limit: 45. CEU: 0.9.
Gregory Baker, Univ. of Tennessee.

> Abstract
This one-day short course—designed for faculty, and students with little or no background in geophysics—provides a brief overview of state-of-the-art near-surface geophysical techniques and applications. The principle objectives for participants are to develop sufficient comprehension of methods to (1) better understand potential applications (including pitfalls and constraints) to their present/future research; and (2) be able to more readily interact and define objectives with geophysical experts when developing collaborations. We will focus on surface (as opposed to borehole) techniques and include seismic (reflection, refraction, and surface waves), ground penetrating radar, electrical, magnetic, and electromagnetic methods.

F G 509. Three-Dimensional Geologic Mapping.
Sat., 8 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, TMH 252
$85; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 65. CEU: 0.9.
Richard Berg, Illinois State Geological Survey; Harvey Thorleifson, Minnesota Geological Survey; Hazen Russell, Geological Survey of Canada.

> Abstract
There is an increasing need for high-quality 3-D regional geological information as attention to environmental and land-use issues, as well as evaluation of regional groundwater systems and their long-term sustainability, continues to grow. Demand for this information is becoming increasingly compelling, but there is a continuing lack of high-quality data, maps, and models. This international workshop focuses on experimenting with new ways to deal with large data sets, integrating data of variable quality with high-quality data, and developing methods to construct 3-D geologic models that can be used for hydrogeologic modeling and similar applications.

F G 510. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (Ground-Based LiDAR) Methods and Applications in Geologic Research and Education.
Sat., 8 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, MSL 235
$63; includes lunch. Limit: 20. CEU: 0.9.
Cosponsor: UNAVCO.
David Phillips, UNAVCO; John Oldow, Univ. of Texas at Dallas; Carlos Aiken, Univ. of Texas at Dallas.

> Abstract
This course will present terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), also known as ground-based LiDAR, workflows and best practices for the acquisition and processing of TLS data; an overview of various TLS platforms; and examples of science and education applications. This one-day workshop will consist of lectures and hands-on application of TLS equipment and data processing. TLS provides very high-resolution images over relatively small areas, is relatively inexpensive to acquire and has been used successfully to support a wide range of geoscience investigations, from outcrop mapping to deformation monitoring. Limited financial support is available for students.

F G 511. Establishing and Sustaining an Undergraduate Research Program: A Professional Development Workshop for New and Future Faculty.
Sat., 8 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, TMH 355
$60; includes continental breakfast, lunch, and course materials. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.9.
Cosponsor: Council on Undergraduate Research Geosciences Division.
Lydia Fox, Univ. of the Pacific; Ed Hansen, Hope College.

> Abstract
This workshop is for faculty and postdoctoral scientists/graduate students. In the morning, topics will focus on establishing a research program with undergraduates (integrating research practices into the classroom, effective approaches to mentoring undergraduate researchers, and identifying funding sources). In the afternoon, topics will cover sustaining an undergraduate research program (maintaining research continuity and productivity, recruiting and mentoring researchers, balancing teaching and research, and funding). Based on the demographics of our participants, we may also include information on how to get a job at an academic institution (primarily undergraduate). Participants may join for either half of the workshop or for the full day.

F G 512. Virtual Field Experiences in Geoscience Education.
Sat., 8 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, SCH 420
$80; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.9.
Richard Kissel, Paleontological Research Institution; Don Duggan-Haas, Paleontological Research Institution; Frank Granshaw, Portland Community College. Attendees will need to bring laptop computers.

> Abstract
The development of virtual field experiences (VFEs) by K-12 teachers and faculty within both formal and informal institutions produces a valuable set of resources for today’s earth-science educators and their students. VFEs perfectly supplement classroom curricula by reinforcing content while providing avenues to explore inquiry and the nature of science. Topics presented within the short course will include the goal of VFEs and their use in geoscience education and research; the “nuts and bolts” of VFE design, including strategies, techniques, and technologies; and geocognition research in visualization and VFE design and use.

F G 513. Gale/Underworld Framework Tutorial.
Sat., 8 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, MSL 238
FREE; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 50. CEU: 0.9.
Cosponsor: Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics.
Louis Moresi, Monash Univ.; Patrice Rey, Univ. of Sydney; Walter Landry, CIG/Caltech.
Attendees will need to bring laptop computers.

> Abstract
Gale/Underworld is an open-source 2-D and 3-D parallel code for modeling long-term tectonic problems, including orogenesis, rifting, subduction, and heat flow. Participants will learn to install and run Gale/Underworld. The tutorial is aimed at researchers who have not previously used Gale/Underworld. It will cover the code’s capabilities, including the variety of boundary conditions, constitutive laws, and initial conditions implemented. Tutorial participants will be introduced to its use on the NSF TeraGrid, where the code is preinstalled. Gale/Underworld is developed and supported by the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics, an NSF-funded membership-governed organization.

F G 514. Introduction to the Acquisition, Visualization, and Interpretation of Airborne LiDAR Data.
Sat., 8 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. — Canceled.
 

F G 515. Setting up a GeoSciML Data Service to Publish Your Geological Map Data.
Sat., 8 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. — Canceled.
 

F G 516. Teaching about Earth’s Climate History.
Sat., 8 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, TMH 350
$80; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 35. CEU: 0.9.
Cosponsors: National Science Foundation; Wiley Blackwell Publishers; GSA Sedimentary Geology Division; GSA Geoscience Education Division.
Kristen St. John, James Madison Univ.; R. Mark Leckie, Univ. of Massachusetts–Amherst; Kate Pound, St. Cloud State Univ.; Megan Jones, North Hennepin Community College; Larry Krissek, Ohio State Univ.

> Abstract
This one-day short course is designed for faculty teaching undergraduate geoscience courses in climate change, oceanography, and historical geology. Data-rich inquiry-based exercises introduced in the short course are classroom tested and are anchored in scientific ocean drilling research (IODP, ANDRILL). Topics to be explored include marine sediments, age determination, stable isotope proxies, Cenozoic climate change, climate cycles, polar climates, and abrupt warming and cooling events. Workshop participants will receive an in-press copy of the new inquiry-based exercise manual Reconstructing Earth’s Climate History (Wiley-Blackwell).

F G 517. Using GIS and Remote Sensing to Teach Geoscience in the 21st Century.
Sat., 8 Oct. — Canceled.
 

F G 518. Education Research I: Conducting Qualitative Geoscience Education Research.
Sat., 8 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon, University of St Thomas, TMH 301
$90; includes lunch. Limit: 35. CEU: 0.4.
Julie Sexton, Univ. of Northern Colorado.

> Abstract
Participants will learn qualitative education data collection and analysis methods used in science education research. Case studies, demonstrations, and hands-on activities will be used to teach participants how to develop qualitative education research studies, collect qualitative data (e.g., interviews), and analyze qualitative data (e.g., coding). This short course is designed for students, university and K–12 educators, and researchers who are engaged in or who plan to be engaged in geoscience education research. This course can be taken alone or in conjunction with the short course “Conducting Education Research II: An overview of quantitative education research methods” (course 523).

F G 519A. Teaching Students How to Learn.
Sat, 8 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon, University of St Thomas, MSL 244
$65 for one course—or, get two-for-one!—$65 for combined courses (519C or 519D [519D is FULL]); includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
Dexter Perkins, Univ. of North Dakota; Karl Wirth, Macalester College.

> Abstract
One of the key goals of a college education is to help students become better learners, but this goal is often overlooked when planning class curriculum and activities. Many studies have shown that the way we teach, and other interactions we have with students, has a significant and controlling impact on student attitudes and motivations. Additionally, what we do in the classroom can help students develop improved (self-regulated) learning skills. These good attitudes, motivations, and learning skills will continue to aid students after they leave our classrooms—as they continue with their academic career and life afterward. In recent years, a number of energetic and innovative teachers have taken steps to improve the attitudes, motivations, and learning skills of their students. Innovations in the classroom have been many and diverse, and a broad range of interventions have been shown to improve students’ ability to be self-regulated learners. This session will include general discussion of the importance of helping students develop the attitudes and motivations (and other affective characteristics) necessary to become expert learners. We will discuss the significance of the affective domain, metacognition, and self-regulated learning skills, and we also will provide many examples of effective classroom activities that have been shown to promote better learning skills in general (e.g., knowledge surveys, learning portfolios, self-reflective essays, mastery exercises, exam wrappers, and more).

F G 519B. Teaching Climate Science with Active Learning Strategies.
Sat., 8 Oct., 8 a.m.–noon, University of St Thomas, MSL 321
$65 for one course—or, get two-for-one!—$65 for combined courses (519C or 519D [519D is FULL]); includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
Karin Kirk, Science Education Resource Center; Susan Buhr, CIRES.

> Abstract
Climate science is a hot topic in today’s classrooms, but understanding the science can be clouded by misconceptions, affective roadblocks, and political concerns. One important strategy for improving student understanding of controversial or misunderstood topics is to use active learning methods by which students can become immersed in the issue. This half-day workshop will provide opportunities to learn specific techniques for teaching climate science, such as using datasets, Google Earth, case studies, and interactive classroom projects. Participants will have hands-on time using various tactics and will emerge with a set of resources that they can apply to their own classrooms.

F G 519C. Retooling Your Geosciences Class: Strategies to Assess Learning and Improve Student Success.
Sat., 8 Oct., 1–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, MSL 244
$65 for one course—or, get two-for-one!—$65 for combined courses (519A or 519B); includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
David McConnell, North Carolina State Univ.; David Steer, Univ. of Akron.

> Abstract
This workshop teaches faculty to develop and use student-centered activities in predominately lecture classes in the geosciences. Many faculty are interested in such methods but don’t know how or where to begin. This half-day workshop will introduce faculty to a schema for developing formative assessment materials. Faculty will work in teams developing and reviewing exercises they can then use in their classes to gauge student levels of learning. Numerous examples and resources available on the Cutting Edge website will be discussed. Participants will leave the workshop with the pedagogical foundation and in-class formative assessment resources they need to better engage their students and improve their learning.

F G 519D. Teaching with Google Earth. — FULL
Sat., 8 Oct., 1–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, MSL 321
$65 for one course—or, get two-for-one!—$65 for combined courses (519A or 519B); includes lunch. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
Peter Selkin, Univ. of Washington–Tacoma; Declan De Paor, Old Dominion Univ.

> Abstract
Google Earth, an easy-to- use tool for presenting data on a three-dimensional model of Earth, is taking geoscience education by storm. This half-day workshop will provide an introduction to Google Earth and highlight a wide variety of examples of its use in introductory geoscience courses. Discussion will focus on tips and strategies for using Google Earth to engage students with geoscience data.

F G 520. Applied Geoscience Skills For Students: What You Need to Know Beyond Undergrad and Grad School.
Sat., 8 Oct., 9 a.m.–5 p.m. — Canceled.
 

F G 521. Geological Applications of Cosmogenic Nuclides: Advances from the CRONUS–Earth Project.
Sat., 8 Oct., 9 a.m.–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, MOH 324
$102; includes lunch and course materials. Limit: 30. CEU: 0.8.
Fred Phillips, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; John Stone, Univ. of Washington; Shasta Marrero, New Mexico Tech; Marc Caffee, Purdue Univ.

> Abstract
Cosmogenic nuclides (10Be, 36Cl, 3He, 26Al, 21Ne, 14C) are commonly used for quantifying erosion rates and chronologies of earth-surface events. However, important aspects of the systematics of cosmogenic nuclide production have remained poorly understood for the past 20 years. The CRONUS–Earth Project was funded by the NSF to help resolve these long-standing difficulties. The Project is nearing completion, and this short course is intended to communicate its findings and tools to the geomorphological community. The course will be aimed at attendees ranging from novices to experienced users. It will include instruction in the use of the CRONUS-Earth online software.

F G 522. J-DSP/ESE Tools for Assessing Global Climate Change and Sustainability.
Sat., 8 Oct. — Canceled.
 

F G 523. Education Research II: Conducting Quantitative Geoscience Education Research.
Sat., 8 Oct., 1–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, TMH 301
$90; includes lunch. Limit: 35. CEU: 0.4.
Julie Sexton, Univ. of Northern Colorado.

> Abstract
This activity-based course serves as an introduction to quantitative education research methods. It is designed for geoscience faculty or students who are or will be conducting quantitative education studies. Topics will include developing quantitative education research questions, designing a quantitative study (e.g., selecting appropriate designs), collecting quantitative data (e.g., surveys), and investigating causality. This course can be taken alone or in conjunction with the short course “Education Research I: Conducting Qualitative Geoscience Education Research” (course 518).

F G 524. Funding Opportunities for Two-Year College Faculty: Possibilities, Challenges, and Successes.
Sat., 8 Oct., 1–5 p.m., University of St Thomas, MOH 417
$45; includes a light snack. Limit: 50. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsor: National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
Eric Baer, Highline Community College; Heather Macdonald, College of William and Mary.

> Abstract
This workshop will provide a venue for discussion with program officers, successful award recipients, and community/two-year-college faculty to share examples of the range of possibilities in NSF-funded projects involving two-year college faculty, discuss strategies and challenges in writing and execution of federally-funded projects, discuss suggestions for writing successful proposals, read successful proposals and consider issues raised by two-year college faculty who are interested in garnering external funds for their work. Particular focus will include overcoming institutional barriers and ideas on managing workloads to be successful in both proposal preparation and project execution.

F G 525. Magnetic Methods in Environmental Studies.
Sat., 8 Oct. — Canceled.
 

F G 526. Teaching with Spreadsheet Modules: Geology of National Parks.
Sat., 8 Oct. — Canceled

 

F G 527. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Using ArcGIS for Geological and Environmental Science Applications.
Sat.–Sun., 8–9 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m., Hilton Minneapolis, Rochester Room
$129; includes continental breakfast and lunch. Limit: 20. CEU: 1.8.
Cosponsor: ESRI.
Joseph Kerski, ESRI; Colin Childs, ESRI.

> Abstract
Participants will be introduced to the use of GIS in geoscience- and environmental-related applications through brief lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on computer exercises. Participants do not need experience with ArcGIS, but familiarity with the Windows OS would be most helpful. A brief introduction to spatial concepts and GIS using ArcGIS ArcMap and Spatial and 3D Analyst extensions will be followed by the creation of a project covering many analysis techniques. Use of the Geodatabase Model schema, mapping templates, and resources for accessing data will be explored.

F G 528. Common Misconceptions about Plate Tectonics, Earth’s Interior, and the Rock Cycle, with Active Learning Approaches to Correct Them.
Sun., 9 Oct., 8 a.m.–12 p.m., Hilton Minneapolis, Director’s Row 3
$50; includes continental breakfast. Limit: 40. CEU: 0.4.
Cosponsors: GSA Geoscience Education Division; National Association of Geoscience Teachers.
Scott Clark, Univ. of Wisconsin–Eau Claire; Karen Kortz, Community College of Rhode Island; Jessica Smay, San José City College.

> Abstract
Students come to college with different conceptions about plate tectonics, Earth’s interior, and the rock cycle. Many of these students, including geoscience majors, will graduate with some of their alternative conceptions still intact. This short course is targeted at college-level and high-school instructors who are interested in learning about (1) the alternative conceptions students hold regarding plate tectonics, Earth’s interior, and the rock cycle; (2) what we, as instructors, may unintentionally be doing to contribute to the acceptance of alternative conceptions; and (3) active learning approaches that instructors can use to challenge and correct alternative conceptions.

T 529. Hands-on, Inquiry-Based Activities in Earth Sciences: Workshop for Middle- and High-School Teachers.
Sun., 9 Oct., 8 a.m.–5 p.m. — Canceled.
 

GSA ASSOCIATED SOCIETY COURSES

GSA will not be handling registration for the following courses; contact conveners listed with the course.

Society of Economic Geologists (SEG) Cu-Ni-PGE Short Course.
Fri.–Sat., 7–8 Oct., 8:30 a.m.–5 p.m.
Sponsor: SEG. Early registration (on or before 6 Sept.): members, $395; nonmembers, $495; member students, $195; non-member students, $245. Late registration: members, $495; nonmembers, $595; member students, $245; non-member students, $295. Limit: 100.Course registration through SEG only at www.segweb.org/activities/ or by phone +1-720-981-7882.
Chusi Li, Indiana Univ.; Edward M. Ripley, Indiana Univ.; Sarah-Jane Barnes, Université du Québec à Chicoutimi; and C. Michael Lesher, Laurentian Univ.

> Abstract
This two-day short course will focus on our current understanding of the genesis of and exploration for several types of magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE deposits. Topics will include (1) fundamental controls on the generation of magmatic sulfide deposits; (2) komatiite-hosted Ni deposits; (3) Ni-Cu-PGE deposits hosted in small mafic-ultramafic intrusions; and (4) PGE deposits in large layered intrusions. The course will be beneficial not only to those who are interested in the geology and exploration of world-class magmatic sulfide deposits but also to those who may utilize sulfide-bearing magmatic systems as aids in the study of secular variations of mafic-ultramafic magmatism in both continental and oceanic settings. A new SEG volume of Reviews in Economic Geology (2011) titled “Magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE Deposits: Geology, Geochemistry and Exploration,” which includes chapters authored by more than 20 of the world’s experts, will be used as the textbook.

Corals and Reef Evolution: Crises, Collapse, and Changes.
Sat., 8 Oct., 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Sponsor: The Paleontological Society.
FREE. Limit: 200 (pre-registration is not necessary—just show up to attend!).
George Stanley, University of Montana, and Ann F. Budd.

> Abstract
Coral reefs are likely the most important and enduring marine ecosystem on the planet, with a geologic record stretching back over 540 million years. Today, both corals and reefs are experiencing global degradation. It is the ability of the paleobiologist to peer backward and forward in time that helps us understand the current crisis, affording insight and glimpses into the past, present, and future of corals and reefs. This short course addresses changes, upheavals, and reorganizations or reefs and reef organisms as well as the evolution of scleractinian corals. Taught by a group of international specialists, the course offers insight into what the future may hold, presenting some common reef themes woven through geologic time.

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